Evolution of a mattress

By September 22, 2019 Tips

Many of the parts of a mattress we take for granted today date back over 40 years or more, new mattresses generally use a combination of these established technologies. A Levitex® mattress, uses only Levitex® Foam. A new innovation in sleep.

Traditionally mattresses were stuffed with anything lying around, wool, hay, down and any other material you could lay your hands on.

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1800s
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In the 1870s the first sprung mattresses were developed in Germany. The downside of a fully sprung mattress is when someone rolls over, anyone sharing the bed feels it and is disturbed, not ideal for their proprioception.

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1870s
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The early 1920s saw the introduction of pocket spring mattresses, allowing the springs to be isolated and negating the movement problem. However a sprung mattress puts too much pressure back on the body.

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1920s
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The 1930’s saw the invention of latex foam, with Dunlop scientist E.A. Murphy using his wife’s cake mixer to create a foam. However fully latex mattresses were very heavy and expensive to make.

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1930s
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Late 1960s saw the invention of memory foam. Famous for hugging the body as it compresses under pressure. Memory foam mattresses became increasingly popular into the 1990s but with more understanding of posture it was realised that memory foam was very poor for spinal alignment and due to the body hugging nature of the foam was incredibly poor for temperature regulation too.

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1960s
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Ahoy there, in the 1970s and early 80s the invention of water beds revolutionised the sleep market, at one point 20% of mattress sales were water beds. They were terrible for a bodies proprioception when asleep. Not ideal for seasickness sufferers.

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1970s
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Airbeds, not just for camping. Developed in the mid 1980s and popular in hospital settings due to their lightweight nature and ability to regulate the air to certain areas. Whilst good for pressure management, again they are terrible for proprioception.

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1980s
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There were no further new technologies in mattresses, just improvements on what was already available until the early 2000s when the first bed in a box was developed. A composite of existing technologies was produced in order to create lightweight mattresses that could be rolled up for easy shipping and sold through social media and the internet. The layers and compositions vary but many still combine a combination of springs, latex and memory foam.

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2000s
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As memory foam continues to be used in mattresses a gel substance was developed to help regulate the temperature. In a full layer it is incredibly heavy so often mattresses contain beads of the gel or very thin layers in order to help their temperature regulation properties.

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2010s
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Developed over the last 5 years and launched last year, Levitex® Foam is the newest innovation in mattress technology. Showing great results in combating pressure, posture and proprioception, it is the first product on the market that doesn’t compromise one of the key factors in sleep problems.

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Today
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